How to Drink Whiskey Properly: A Beginners Guide

How to Drink & Enjoy Whiskey Properly

BY MASTER DISTILLER & BLENDER ROB DIETRICH

First off, drinking whiskey like a pro requires several skillsets—all easily learned—and the ability to have an open mind to learn new skills about something you may have already been doing for many years: drinking your favorite whiskey.

DRINKING WHISKEY LIKE A PRO BOOTCAMP

Here are 3 ‘Drinking Rules of Engagement’ to help you understand how to nose, taste, and trust your palate when drinking whiskey in a few short steps.

RULE #1: NOSE THE WHISKEY

If you are nosing a great whiskey, then you are already making great decisions, and this will take you straight to your happy place.

  • Step 1: To begin, keep your lips slightly parted and inhale through both your mouth and nose at the same time; this helps keep that flare of heat from hitting your nostrils like a blast of hot desert wind.
  • Step 2: Slowly draw in nice, even breaths and allow yourself to fully delve into the nuances of the aroma. Does it smell like vanilla? Caramel? Grandma’s kitchen? Your buddy’s garage?
  • Step 3: Attempt to identify exactly what it is that you are smelling and jot down a few descriptions to help you discern each note.

 

Just know that what you are smelling is always the right answer. It’s your palate after all; what you smell is what you smell. Trust that.

RULE #2: SIP THE WHISKEY

This isn’t Cabo. We’re not here to shoot the whiskey; that is reserved for that unpalatable cheap stuff that tastes like boot camp floor polish. Rule #2 is in place to help you discern your palate and over time, refine it with practice.

  • First, sip the whiskey and roll it around over the sides of your mouth and back of the tongue. The first sip will allow your mouth to acclimate to the warmth of the whiskey.
  • On the second sip, repeat the maneuvers of the first sip, but this time add a slight chewing motion and let the whiskey roll over your tongue. You will be able to pick up on many more nuances of the whiskey on this second sip. What do you taste? Butterscotch? Cinnamon? Black cherries? Walnuts? Fresh-cut hay?

 

Again, this is your palate and yours alone. Trust your palate, identify likes and dislikes about the whiskey, move beyond to challenge yourself in identifying each note in the flavor profile of the whiskey. Write down descriptions as best you can and concentrate on what you can identify, not what you can’t. There are no wrong answers; over time, you will get better at finding those more elusive identifiers.

RULE #3: MODERATION & WATER ARE YOUR BEST FRIENDS

Although Oscar Wilde famously quoted, “Everything in moderation, including moderation”, it is always wise to regulate how much whiskey you are attempting to throw down, and I encourage you to take the time to truly engage and enjoy that whiskey you have spent your hard-earned dollars on.

As a final step to properly tasting your whiskey, add a small dash of water (filtered if you have it) to allow the whiskey to open-up and release the delicate nuances of the flavor profile. You will be amazed at how just the smallest amount of water will dissipate that heat and allow the whiskey to bloom.

 

Nice work! You have just graduated from Drinking Like a Pro boot camp and are now on your way to learning even more about your palate than you ever knew possible. Now grab a bottle of BLACKENED American Whiskey and go drink like a Pro!

Cheers!

Rob

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